Dienstag, 27. Juli 2021

Staatsstreich innerhalb des Staatsstreichs“. Tschad: Militärischer Übergang Armee und Präsidentensohn ergreifen die Macht

Helga Dickow schreibt für die iz3w einen Artikel über die Machtsituation im Tschad nach dem Tod des Langzeitherrschers Idriss Déby. Mehr hier.

Dienstag, 20. Juli 2021

ALMA Reviews Blog: Valeurs républicaines et vivre-ensemble au Tchad. Appartenances religieuses

Ladiba Gondeu; University of N´Djamena, Chad

Published in 2020 by  L’Harmattan, Paris

Available at: https://www.editions-harmattan.fr/livre-valeurs_republicaines_et_vivre_ensemble_au_tchad_appartenances_religieuses_ladiba_gondeu-9782343189024-65940.html

Social science analyses by historians and anthropologists usually refer to the past. However, due to the significance of their subject, some publications maintain their topical relevance over time. In fact, sometimes current affairs can render such research even more topical. Ladiba Gondeu’s book is one of these. In Valeurs républicaines et vivre-ensemble au Tchad. Appartenances religieuses (Republican Values and Coexistence in Chad. Religious allegiances), which he calls an essay, Gondeu shows that essential political debates in Chad since independence have revolved around cohabitation and peaceful coexistence. He describes how coexistence has been anything but peaceful in this central African country over the past 61 years, however. Of course, when his work was published in 2020 Gondeu could not have foreseen the sudden death of long-time president Idriss Déby Itno and the subsequent military coup, nor the takeover of power by a military transitional government in April 2021. Yet precisely because of this dynamic, the issues of “coexistence and republic” as well as the future political order of the country are currently of unsurpassed relevance. Since the coup, the opposition and civil society have been discussing the restoration of a democratic order in a religiously and ethnically diverse stratified state, in which the small but powerful elite has enriched itself for decades while the population remains completely impoverished. Gondeu, a social anthropologist at the University of N’Djamena, enumerates and discusses these points.

Gondeu chooses the disputes over the introduction of a new personal and family code to reveal the complexity of Chadian society. Through an examination of discussions about the new legal code, he sheds light on the different groups and lines of conflict that characterise the country. Furthermore, along these lines of conflict, he shows why no sense of national identity has been able to develop in Chad since the end of the French colonial rule. On the contrary, regional, linguistic, ethnic and religious affiliations continue to determine self-identification, a sense of belonging and social and political alliances. Equality and equal treatment of men and women are a long way off. He blames the authoritarian political leadership for the main burden of the cleavages, as it has used them for decades in a precisely calculated way for the preservation of its own political and economic power.

By detailing the – still not adopted – personal and family code (Chadian legislation is modelled on that of the France), Gondeu exposes the different social currents and interests that are hidden behind the dry word “cleavage”. The new code, which encompasses 991 articles on 243 pages and was worked on from 1994 to 2000, is often in conflict with Muslim and Christian values. Moreover, traditional law, which has been on an equal footing with state and religious jurisprudence since colonial times, also sets different standards than modern jurisprudence in the code, as Gondeu illustrates.

Referring to selected paragraphs of the draft of the new code, Gondeu explains the different views on the status of women, marriage, inheritance, adoption and many other points of the Protestant and Catholic churches, Islamic authorities represented in the Supreme Council for Islamic Affairs, and traditional law. The various principles, doctrines and traditions handed down are difficult to reconcile. It is therefore not surprising that it has still not been possible to reach agreement on the code. Yet it was drafted with the intention of strengthening national identity and homogenising the legal authorities.

Gondeu is not primarily concerned with the adoption of personal and family law, but with the values that make the population of a state a nation. Despite all the deficits and cleavages he points out, he nevertheless concludes optimistically. On the one hand, he relies on the secularism enshrined in the constitution. But ultimately, his hope for the feasibility of social transformation rests on his fellow citizens and especially on the younger generation. Together they will grow a “republican tree”, as he calls it. This republican public spirit is needed today more than ever. After all, Chad should not remain in the hands of a ruling dynasty, in the opinion of this reviewer.

Ladiba Gondeu also introduces the reader to the established literature on the theory of state and society. This serves as an interpretive basis for his own analysis of the complexity of Chadian society and politics and the debates that have arisen from it. His focus on the text of the planned code is particularly original and helpful. As an insider and close observer of Chadian politics, Gondeu has a sharpened eye for nuance. In some places, a list of acronyms would have been helpful. Otherwise, the book is an impressive read for anyone who wants to better understand and contextualise the complexity of Chad and its cleavages.

Reviewed by: Helga Dickow

_______________________

To all contributions of the ALMA Reviews Blog

Foto: ©Cynthia Matonhodze, Harare, Zimbabwe

Dienstag, 20. Juli 2021

ALMA Reviews Blog: Valeurs républicaines et vivre-ensemble au Tchad. Appartenances religieuses

Ladiba Gondeu; University of N´Djamena, Chad

Published in 2020 by  L’Harmattan, Paris

Available at: https://www.editions-harmattan.fr/livre-valeurs_republicaines_et_vivre_ensemble_au_tchad_appartenances_religieuses_ladiba_gondeu-9782343189024-65940.html

Sozialwissenschaftliche Analysen von Historikern und Anthropologen beziehen sich in der Regel auf Vergangenes. Bedingt durch die Dringlichkeit ihres Themas verlieren manche Veröffentlichungen allerdings nie ihre ihren aktuellen Bezug, sondern werden gleichermaßen noch von der Aktualität überholt. Das Buch von Ladiba Gondeu gehört zu ihnen. Wie sein von ihm als Essay herausgegebenes Werk „Republikanische Werte und Zusammenleben im Tschad“ zeigt, drehen sich in diesem zentralafrikanischen Land seit der Unabhängigkeit wesentliche politische Debatten um Kohabitation und friedliches Zusammenleben. Gondeu beschreibt, dass das Zusammenleben in den vergangenen 61 Jahren allerdings alles andere als friedlich war. Den überraschenden Tod des langjährigen Präsidenten Idriss Déby Itno und den darauffolgenden Militärputsch sowie die Machtübernahme durch eine militärische Übergangsregierung im April 2021 konnte Gondeu mit seinem 2020 veröffentlichten Werk natürlich nicht vorhersehen. Aber genau wegen dieser Dynamik sind die Themen „Zusammenleben und Republik“ sowie die zukünftige politische Ordnung des Landes derzeit an Aktualität nicht zu überbieten. Opposition und Zivilgesellschaft diskutieren seit dem Putsch über die Wiederherstellung einer demokratischen Ordnung in einem religiös und ethnisch vielfältig stratifizierten Staat, im dem sich eine kleine Machtelite seit Jahrzehnten bereichert hat und die Bevölkerung völlig verarmt ist. All diese Punkte führt Gondeu, social anthropologist an der Universität von N’Djamena, auf und diskutiert sie für den Tschad.

Gondeu wählt die Auseinandersetzungen um die Einführung eines neuen Personen- und Familienrechts, um die Komplexität der tschadischen Gesellschaft aufzuzeigen. Anhand der Diskussionen um das neue Rechtsbuch beleuchtet er die verschiedenen Gruppen sowie Konfliktlinien, die das Land prägen. Desweiteren zeigt er entlang dieser Konfliktlinien auf, warum sich im Tschad seit dem Ende der französischen Kolonialzeit noch kein Nationalgefühl entwickeln konnte. Im Gegenteil, Zugehörigkeit zu Region, zu Sprache, zu ethnischer und religiöser Gruppe bestimmen nach wie vor die Selbsteinordung, das Zugehörigkeitsgefühl sowie die sozialen und politischen Allianzen. Gleichheit und Gleichbehandlung von Männern und Frauen sind in weiter Ferne. Der autoritären politischen Führung lastet er die Hauptlast für die Cleavages an, da sie sie seit Jahrzehnten genau berechnend für ihren eigenen politischen und wirtschaftlichen Machterhalt nutzt.

Mit der detaillierten Darstellung des – noch immer nicht verabschiedeten – Personen- und Familienrechts (die tschadische Gesetzgebung orientiert sich an der französischen) stellt Gondeu die unterschiedlichen gesellschaftlichen Strömungen und Interessen dar, die sich hinter dem trockenen Wort Cleavage verbergen. Das neue Gesetzbuch, immerhin ein Werk von 991 Artikeln auf 243 Seiten, an dem von 1994 bis 2000 gearbeitet wurde, steht oft nicht nur im Widerspruch mit muslimischen und christlichen Werten. Auch das traditionelle Recht, seit der Kolonialzeit gleichberechtigt mit staatlicher und religiöser Rechtsprechung, setzt andere Maßstäbe als die moderne Rechtsprechung, wie Gondeu darstellt.

Gondeu erläutert die unterschiedlichen Ansichten über den Status der Frau, die Ehe, das Erbe, Adoption und viele andere Punkte der protestantischen und katholischen Kirchen, islamischen Autoritäten in der Form des Obersten Rats für Islamische Angelegenheiten sowie des traditionellen Rechts. Die verschiedenen Prinzipien, Lehrmeinungen und überlieferten Traditionen sind schwer miteinander zu vereinbaren. Nicht verwunderlich also, dass immer noch keine Einigkeit über das Gesetz erreicht werden konnte. Dabei wurde es ausgerechnet in der Absicht zur Stärkung der nationalen Identität und Homogenisierung der juristischen Instanzen ausgearbeitet.

Gondeu geht es nicht in erster Linie um die Verabschiedung des Personen- und Familienrechts, sondern um die Werte, die die Bevölkerung eines Staates zu einer Nation werden lassen. Trotz aller von ihm aufgezeigten Defizite und Cleavages schließt dennoch optimistisch. Zum einem setzt er auf die in der Verfassung verankerte Laizität. Aber letztendlich liegt seine Hoffnung auf die Machbarkeit von sozialer Transformation auf seinen Landleuten und auch auf der jungen Generation. Gemeinsam werden sie einen „Republikanischen Baum“, wie er ihn nennt, wachsen lassen. Diesen republikanischen Gemeinsinn braucht es heute mehr denn je. Schließlich, dieser Satz sei der Rezensentin erlaubt, sollte der Tschad nicht in den Händen einer Herrscherdynastie bleiben.

Ladiba Gondeu führt den Leser auch in die gängige Literatur zur Theorie von Staat und Gesellschaft ein. Diese dient ihm als Interpretationsgrundlage für seine eigene Analyse der Komplexität der tschadischen Gesellschaft und Politik sowie der daraus entstandenen Debatten. Besonders originell und hilfreich ist dabei seine Konzentration auf den Gesetzestext. Als Insider und enger Beobachter der tschadischen Politik hat Gondeu einen geschärften Blick für Nuancen. An einigen Stellen wäre ein Abkürzungsverzeichnis hilfreich gewesen. Ansonsten ist das Buch eine eindrückliche Lektüre für jeden, der die Komplexität des Tschad und seine Cleavages besser verstehen und einordnen möchte.

Reviewed by: Helga Dickow

_______________________

To all contributions of the ALMA Reviews Blog

Foto: ©Cynthia Matonhodze, Harare, Zimbabwe

Webinar: Elite Networks and the Transregional Dimension of Authoritarianism: Sino-Emirati Relations in Times of a Global Pandemic

Liebe Freunde und Interessierte des Arnold-Bergstraesser-Instituts,

am Donnerstag, den 15. Juli 2021 um 12:30 Uhr wird die Politikwissenschaftlerin Julia Gurol ihr Paper zu sino-emiratischen Beziehungen auf dem Gebiet der digitalen Überwachung vorstellen. Sie zeigt, dass die autoritäre Diffusion unter dem Schirm der Pandemiebekämpfung nicht räumlich an geopolitische Nähe oder andere strukturelle Ähnlichkeiten gebunden ist.

Webinar: Elite Networks and the Transregional Dimension of Authoritarianism: Sino-Emirati Relations in Times of a Global Pandemic

Liebe Freunde und Interessierte des Arnold-Bergstraesser-Instituts,

am Donnerstag, den 15. Juli 2021 um 12:30 Uhr wird die Politikwissenschaftlerin Julia Gurol ihr Paper zu sino-emiratischen Beziehungen auf dem Gebiet der digitalen Überwachung vorstellen. Sie zeigt, dass die autoritäre Diffusion unter dem Schirm der Pandemiebekämpfung nicht räumlich an geopolitische Nähe oder andere strukturelle Ähnlichkeiten gebunden ist.

Freitag, 25. Juni 2021

Video: Perspectives on migrant immobilities during the COVID-19 pandemic from the Global South

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, migrant communities have become immobile - stranded in destination countries or unable to continue their journey in transit or in countries of origin. In the research project "Pandemic (Im)mobility: COVID-19 and Migrant Communities in the Global South", researchers from Mexico, Nepal, Qatar, Zimbabwe and Germany collaborated to outline how migrant communities in the Global South were affected by the pandemic and how they responded. 

Watch a video summary of the research from the different researchers here.

Zahra Babar, Associate Director for Research at CIRS at Georgetown University in Qatar, talks about the topics and projects is she currently working on, how  the COVID-19 pandemic affected different migrant communities in Qatar and in the Gulf and how the state approach towards migrants has changed during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Luisa Gabriela Morales Vega, professor at the Autonomous University of Mexico State, and a member of the Research in Progress Seminar on Critical Legal Studies and Migration at the National University of Mexico spoke aboout her research interests, how the COVID-19 pandemic affected the movement and conditions of migrant communities in Mexico and the recent developments in the border regime between Mexico and USA.

Joyce Takaindisa, a scholar of migration and displacement in Zimbabwe discussed her research interests, the current (pandemic) conditions of Zimbabwean migrant communities in South Africa and how the border regime between Zimbabwe and South Africa has changed during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Anita Ghimire, research director at the Nepal Institute for Social and Environmental Research, talked about her research interests, how COVID-19 pandemic has affected emigrant communities from Nepal and how  the pandemic altered the decision-making processes of Nepalese migrants.

More information on this project.

Freitag, 25. Juni 2021

Video: Wissenschaftlerinnen über Immobilitäten von MigrantInnen während der Corona-Pandemie

Seit dem Beginn der COVID-19-Pandemie sind Migrant*innen immobil geworden - sie sitzen in den Zielländern fest oder sind nicht in der Lage, ihre Reise im Transit oder in den Herkunftsländern fortzusetzen. Im Forschungsprojekt "Pandemic (Im)mobility: COVID-19 and Migrant Communities in the Global South" arbeiten WissenschaftlerInnen aus Mexiko, Nepal, Katar, Simbabwe und Deutschland zusammen, um darzulegen, wie Migrant*innen im Globalen Süden von der Pandemie betroffen waren und wie sie darauf reagiert haben. Diese Untersuchungen wurden anschließend in Relation zueinander gestellt.

Hier berichten die WissenschaftlerInnen nun via Video auf unsere Fragen.

Zahra Babar ist Associate Director für Forschung am CIRS an der Georgetown University in Katar. Wir haben ihr 3 Fragen zu den Themen und Projekten gestellt, an denen sie derzeit arbeitet, wie sich die COVID-19-Pandemie auf verschiedene Migrantengemeinschaften in Katar und am Golf ausgewirkt hat und wie sich der staatliche Umgang mit Migranten während der COVID-19-Pandemie verändert hat.

Anita Ghimire ist Forschungsleiterin am Nepal Institute for Social and Environmental Research. Sie beantwortet Fragen zu ihren Forschungsinteressen, wie sich die COVID-19-Pandemie auf Auswanderergemeinschaften aus Nepal ausgewirkt hat und wie die Pandemie die Entscheidungsprozesse der nepalesischen Migranten verändert hat.

Joyce Takaindisa ist Wissenschaftlerin für Migration und Vertreibung in Simbabwe und beantwortet 3 Fragen zu ihren Forschungsinteressen, den aktuellen (pandemischen) Bedingungen der simbabwischen Migrantengemeinschaften in Südafrika und wie hat sich das Grenzregime zwischen Simbabwe und Südafrika während der COVID-19-Pandemie verändert.

Luisa Gabriela Morales Vega ist Professorin an der Autonomen Universität des Bundesstaates Mexiko und Mitglied des Research in Progress Seminars für kritische Rechtsstudien und Migration an der Nationalen Universität von Mexiko. Wir fragten sie nach ihren Forschungsinteressen, wie sich die COVID-19-Pandemie auf die Bewegung und die Bedingungen von Migrantengemeinschaften in Mexiko ausgewirkt hat und nach den jüngsten Entwicklungen im Grenzregime zwischen Mexiko und den USA.

Weitere Informationen zum Projekt